Jenna A. Lamphere

Instructional Assistant Professor
Department of Liberal Studies



E-mail: jlamphere@tamug.edu
Phone: +1 (409) 740.4758
Fax: +1 (409) 740.4962

Classroom Lab Building (CLB), Office 124


CV


Learn more about Jenna A. Lamphere

Get To Know Jenna A. Lamphere

What in your life drew you to your current field of study?

I grew up in a small town outside of Detroit, Michigan. Once the automotive capital of the world, the twin processes of neoliberal globalization and deindustrialization left the region fraught with severe and pervasive socio-environmental problems, including high unemployment, widespread poverty, increased social instability, dirty water and air, as well as vacant and polluted land. I was nine years old when the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement entered into force, which in many ways transformed the U.S. auto industry, prompting factories to relocate to the Global South where regulations tend to be weaker and labor cheaper. Problems were acerbated by the 2008 financial crisis, which bankrupted U.S. automakers. Many of my family and friends were devastated, their livelihoods having depended upon the auto industry. Neighborhoods were increasingly boarded up, as families able to move did, increasing strain on city leaders to provide for vulnerable populations with depleting resources. In 2013, Detroit filed bankruptcy, struggling with emptying communities, crime, unpaid utility bills, inadequate public services, and an expensive pension system.

Growing up outside of Detroit significantly impacted my professional development goals. Early on as an undergraduate student, I discovered the sociological perspective as a systematic understanding of the political-economic forces that profoundly impacted the people and communities about whom I cared. Given my interest, I deliberately selected the University of Tennessee’s graduate program for sociology, which is predicated on social justice, and in 2017, I was excited to join the Texas A&M system to help coordinate the Galveston campus’s new Tourism and Coastal Community Development program.

What do you hope your students gain from studying or working with you?

Sociology’s promise lies in its ability to transform students’ views of the social world, rendering visible the structures organizing their lives and the power they have to reconstitute them in more socially just ways. As a professor, I foster the critical and analytic skills students need to realize this promise. By teaching foundational disciplinary knowledge and the methods sociologists employ to create and assess this knowledge, I help students better understand social processes and see how their actions work to maintain, as well as change, structures. I challenge students to integrate their life experiences and substantive interests with the science of sociology, and through doing so, invest in a science that aims to make significant societal contributions.

What are you passionate about in your personal life?

I see my personal and professional life as intrinsically linked. I am passionate about helping build equitable and ecologically sound communities. When considering the effects of climate change, socio-environmentally just development is especially important for our coastal communities, as we can expect rising sea levels and more frequent and extreme weather events. How we plan for and respond to such disasters is deeply important to the sustainability of our coastal communities, including that of my new home, Galveston. I am hopeful! I believe that through raising awareness, civic empowerment, and inclusive planning, we can develop economically prosperous and environmentally sustainable communities.

Education
Ph.D. Environmental Sociology & Political Economy, The University of Tennessee, 2016
M.A.
Environmental Sociology, The University of Tennessee, 2012
B.A. Sociology & Psychology, Arkansas Tech University, 2004
Courses Taught
Introduction to Sociology
Environment and Natural Resources
Environmental Sociology
Food, Agriculture, and Society
Political Sociology
Social Research
Green Criminology
Publications
Lamphere, Jenna A. and Jon Shefner. 2018. “How to Green: Institutions and Actors in Three U.S. Cities.” Critical Sociology 44(2): 303-322.

Lamphere, Jenna A. and Elizabeth A. East. 2017. “Monsanto’s Biotechnology Politics: Discourses of Legitimation.” Environmental Communication 11(1): 75-89.

Lamphere, Jenna A. and Jon Shefner. 2015. “Situating the Green Economy: Discourses, Cooptation, and State Change.” Current Perspectives in Social Theory 34: 101-124.

Presentations
2018: “Galveston, TX: Tourism and Coastal Community Development.” (Jenna A. Lamphere), paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southern Sociological Society, April 4-7, New Orleans, LA.

2017: “The University of Tennessee’s Green Economy Initiative: Addressing Persistent Poverty with Inclusive and Equitable Growth.” (Jenna A. Lamphere and Emily Medley), paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southern Sociological Society, March 29-April 1, Greenville, SC.

2016: “How to Green: Institutions and Actors in Four U.S. Cities.” (Jenna A. Lamphere and Jon Shefner), paper presented and session organized at the XIV World Congress of Rural Sociology, August 10-14, Toronto, Canada.

2016: “Herding Green Cats: Environmental Stakeholders in a Green Economy.” (Emily Medley, Jon Shefner, and Jenna A. Lamphere), paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southern Sociological Society, April 13-16, Atlanta, GA.

2015: “Green Economic Development: Contentious Discourses and State Activity.” (Jenna A. Lamphere and Jon Shefner), paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, August 22-25, Chicago, IL.

2015: “Monsanto’s Biotechnology Politics: Discourses of Legitimation.” (Jenna A. Lamphere and Elizabeth A. East), paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for the Study of Social Problems, August 21-23, Chicago, IL.

2015: “Situating the Green Economy: Discourses, Cooptation, and State Change.” (Jenna A. Lamphere and Jon Shefner), paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southern Sociological Society, March 25-28, New Orleans, LA.

Grants and Fellowships
2015: Thomas-Penley Fellowship, The University of Tennessee ($10,000).

2015: Ready for the World Grant for event Weapons of the Niche: Mobilizing Support for the Green Economy in a Time of Polarized Politics with David Hess, The University of Tennessee ($1,319).

2015: Dissertation Support Grant, The University of Tennessee, Office of Research and Engagement ($750).

Awards & Recognition
2016: Graduate Student Research Award, The University of Tennessee, Department of Sociology.

2012 - 2016: Chancellor’s Top-off Award, The University of Tennessee ($10,000).

2012: Graduate Student Service Award, The University of Tennessee, Department of Sociology.
Professional Appointments
2018: Workforce Development Committee, Galveston Regional Chamber of Commerce.